Primary Health Services

  • P (519) 843-3961
  • F (226) 383-3962
  • E info@impactphysio.ca

  • Our Fergus office:
  • 855 St. David St. North Unit #4
  • Fergus, ON N1M 2W3
  • * just north of Walmart
  • Monday9:00 am-5:00 pm
    Tuesday9:30 am-8:00 pm
    Wednesday9:00 am-8:00 pm
    Thursday9:00 am-8:00 pm
    Friday8:30 am-3:00 pm

  • Our Arthur office:
  • 110 Charles Street (2nd floor)
  • Arthur, ON
  • * above the library
  • Monday9:00 am-4:30 pm
    Tuesday9:00 am-4:30 pm
    Wednesday9:00 am-4:30 pm
    Thursday12:00 pm-8:00 pm
    Friday8:30 am-12:00 pm

  • Both locations have free parking and
  • are wheelchair accessible.
  • Map to our clinics

Pelvic Health for Women

What is Pelvic Floor Physiotherapy?
A unique type of physiotherapy that focuses on the muscles, connective tissues, and structures that make up or affect the pelvis.
Generally pelvic floor dysfunctions can be divided into those caused by a weak and lengthened pelvic floor (hypotonicity) or a shortened and tight pelvic floor (hypertonicity).
Kegals are not the solution for all pelvic floor dysfunctions. Although these can be helpful for those that have a hypotonic pelvic floor, they can cause more harm than good for those with conditions resulting from a hypertonic pelvic floor.
Did you know?
An estimated 10-40% of women struggle with urinary incontinence.1
A review of the scientific research revealed that women with incontinence who engaged in regular pelvic floor muscle training had less leakage, improved quality of life, and reported significant improvements in their symptoms.1
Kegals are not for everyone. Many individuals with pelvic pain and overactive bladders actually have muscles that are too tight and kegals can actually make you feel worse.2
Tightness in your pelvic floor can cause pain in other areas of your body including your back, legs, abdomen, and/or hips.3
Approximately 25% of women struggle with chronic pelvic pain that can be addressed by a pelvic floor physiotherapist.4
What do we treat?
Some of the common conditions that result from a hypotonic pelvic floor that we treat include: stress urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence pelvic organ prolapse, sacroiliac joint dysfunction, rectus diastasis, vaginismus, dyspareunia, vulvodynia, and constipation.
What is involved in an Assessment?

First a thorough history taking through completion of questionnaires and discussion with your therapist. Your therapist will then complete an evaluation of posture, movement, and breathing strategies. An examination of muscles and connective tissues will be performed to determine if strengthening or stretching is required.

We recommend an internal evaluation to accurately assess the tissues that make up the pelvic floor. This is important to determine what is happening in the small muscles that connect to the pelvis, and to best develop a treatment plan. If you are uncomfortable with having an internal evaluation you can discuss alternative options with your therapist.

What is involved in treatment?

Treatment will be designed for your specific needs but generally includes: education, exercises, and manual therapy.

Is it painful?

There should be minimal pain involved in an internal evaluation, however it is normal to feel some pressure or discomfort. If you are being treated for certain conditions such as vaginismus, dyspareunia, or vulvodynia you may feel some discomfort during the evaluation or treatment, however, please notify your therapist because techniques can be modified as needed and you should never feel more than mild pain at any time.

Are there any risks?

Generally risks are very low or mild but common ones to be aware of include:

  • Bleeding during or after treatment
  • Pain during or after treatment
  • Anxiety or emotional response
  • Skin reaction to gloves or lubricant
  • Nausea or light headed

Please do not hesitate to inform your therapist if you are experiencing any of the following symptoms so that treatment can be modified appropriately.

Who is not appropriate for treatment?
  • Active infection
  • Active rectal bleeding
  • Radiation therapy within the past 6-12 weeks
  • Radioactive seed implants (prostate cancer treatment)

  1. Demoulin C and Hey-Smith J. Pelvic floor muscle training vs no treatment or inactive control treatment for urinary incontinence in women. Cochrane database of systematic reviews. 2010; 1: CD005654.
  2. Vandyken C and Hilton S. The Puzzle of Pelvic Pain: A Rehabilitation Framework for Balancing Tissue Dysfunction and Central Sensitization II: A Review of Treatment Considerations. Womens health, American Physical Therapy Association. 2012; 36 (1): 44-54.
  3. Fitzgerald M and Kotarinos R. Rehabilitation of the short pelvic floor I: Background and patient evaluation. Int Urogynecol J 2003; 14: 261–268.
  4. Hilton S and Vandyken C. The Puzzle of Pelvic Pain—A Rehabilitation Framework for Balancing Tissue Dysfunction and Central Sensitization, I: Pain Physiology and Evaluation for the Physical Therapist. Womens health, American Physical Therapy Association. 2011; 35 (3): 103-113.

Pelvic Health for Men

What is Pelvic Floor Physiotherapy?
A unique type of physiotherapy that focuses on the muscles, connective tissues, and structures that make up or affect the pelvis.
Generally pelvic floor dysfunctions can be divided into those caused by a weak and lengthened pelvic floor (hypotonicity) or a shortened and tight pelvic floor (hypertonicity).
Kegals are not the solution for all pelvic floor dysfunctions. Although these can be helpful for those that have a hypotonic pelvic floor, they can cause more harm than good for those with conditions resulting from a hypertonic pelvic floor.
Did you know?
An estimated 9% of men in the United States struggle with chronic pelvic pain and/or prostatitis that can be helped with pelvic floor physiotherapy.1
A review of the scientific research revealed that women with incontinence who engaged in regular pelvic floor muscle training had less leakage, improved quality of life, and reported significant improvements in their symptoms.1
Kegals are not for everyone. Many individuals with pelvic pain and overactive bladders actually have muscles that are too tight and kegals can actually make you feel worse.2
Tightness in your pelvic floor can cause pain in other areas of your body including your back, legs, abdomen, and/or hips.3
Research suggests that pelvic floor strengthening can significantly improve urinary incontinence in men after a prostectomy.4
What do we treat?
Some of the common conditions that result from a hypotonic pelvic floor that we treat include: stress urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence, sacroiliac joint dysfunction, chronic non-bacterial prostatitis, constipation, and post prostatectomy.
What is involved in an Assessment?

First a thorough history taking through completion of questionnaires and discussion with your therapist. Your therapist will then complete an evaluation of posture, movement, and breathing strategies. An examination of muscles and connective tissues will be performed to determine if strengthening or stretching is required.

We recommend an internal evaluation to accurately assess the tissues that make up the pelvic floor. This is important to determine what is happening in the small muscles that connect to the pelvis, and to best develop a treatment plan. If you are uncomfortable with having an internal evaluation you can discuss alternative options with your therapist.

What is involved in treatment?

Treatment will be designed for your specific needs but generally includes: education, exercises, and manual therapy.

Is it painful?

There should be minimal pain involved in an internal evaluation, however it is normal to feel some pressure or discomfort. If you are being treated for certain conditions such as vaginismus, dyspareunia, or vulvodynia you may feel some discomfort during the evaluation or treatment, however, please notify your therapist because techniques can be modified as needed and you should never feel more than mild pain at any time.

Are there any risks?

Generally risks are very low or mild but common ones to be aware of include:

  • Bleeding during or after treatment
  • Pain during or after treatment
  • Anxiety or emotional response
  • Skin reaction to gloves or lubricant
  • Nausea or light headed

Please do not hesitate to inform your therapist if you are experiencing any of the following symptoms so that treatment can be modified appropriately.

Who is not appropriate for treatment?
  • Active infection
  • Active rectal bleeding
  • Radiation therapy within the past 6-12 weeks
  • Radioactive seed implants (prostate cancer treatment)

  1. Hilton S and Vandyken C. The Puzzle of Pelvic Pain—A Rehabilitation Framework for Balancing Tissue Dysfunction and Central Sensitization, I: Pain Physiology and Evaluation for the Physical Therapist. Womens health, American Physical Therapy Association. 2011; 35 (3): 103-113.
  2. Vandyken C and Hilton S. The Puzzle of Pelvic Pain: A Rehabilitation Framework for Balancing Tissue Dysfunction and Central Sensitization II: A Review ofTreatment Considerations. Womens health, American Physical Therapy Association. 2012; 36 (1): 44-54.
  3. Fitzgerald M and Kotarinos R. Rehabilitation of the short pelvic floor I: Background and patient evaluation. Int Urogynecol J 2003; 14: 261–268.
  4. Sacco E et al. Efficacy of a supervised, affordable program of perioperative pelvic floor muscle training in improving the recovery of continence after radical prostatectomy: A randomized controlled trial.BMC Urol; 2014; 14: 99-100.